PLANTING ROSES IN SMALL SPACE


Not everybody have a huge estate or for that matter what we can consider a big yard.  In a typical suburbia, most home lots measure 50 x 100 ft. and some areas have only lots 50 x 50 ft.  As a matter of fact, most homes in the United States now sit on small lots.  That should not deter you from planting roses.

There is one thing to remember in planting a rose and it’s synonymous to buying real estate.  It is LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION.  Roses do not like to be near trees because the trees compete with roses for nourishment.  Also roses need at least six hours of sunlight although I have seen some roses which do very well in maybe 4 hours.  I have “Bow Bells”, a pink David Austin rose that blooms non-stop all summer in the shady part of my rose beds and in August when every rose in my garden takes a breather, this rose is still blooming its head off.  “Knockout” is another rose that’s known to bloom in the shady part of the garden and is very disease resistant. 

For starters, if you have a post mailbox or a lamppost, you can plant one next to it.  Plant some roses in your entryway as a great welcome statement for your visitors.  Roses in your front yard are a sure invitation for people passing your house to stop by and smell the roses. Try to plant fragrant roses in your front yard.  You’ll be surprised how many people stop in their track while you’re gardening and telling you that you have a beautiful garden and doing a fabulous job.

You can also plant roses in containers.  This is a good alternative if your yard is really small or if you live in an apartment.  Containers now come in all sizes and shapes and you can plant roses in containers as long as there is ample room for the roots to grow.  You can mix and match, group them in any way you want and if it does not please you, you can move them around as you would move your furniture.  That’s the fun of container gardening.  There are several varieties of roses that are suitable for containers.  You can have roses in hanging baskets, containers for patios and terraces, windowsill, pots and urns for entryways and even standard (tree) roses in containers.  There are unlimited options for you with containers.  All you need is a lot of imagination.  I have Caldwell Pink in a pot and Drift Roses are good candidatesfor hanging baskets.

If you are running out of space, there is also another route to take.  Try vertical gardening.  Climbers and ramblers are good for this type of gardening.  You only need a limited space because the roses grow up and out.  There are several excellent climbers and ramblers to choose from.  “Fourth of July” is an excellent climber.  Its striped blooms remind you of an exuberant firework display on the fourth of July.  “New Dawn” is a very popular pink climber.  “Abraham Darby”, an apricot David Austin shrub rose which grow so vigorously that you can train it to be a climber.  So does “William Baffin”, a red rose in the Canadian Explorer series.  “Sally Holmes”, another vigorous climber is another excellent choice.

You can also try using miniature roses or the miniflora roses.  These minis and minifloras are great choice for tight spot.  There are thousands of selections to choose from and every year, more introductions come to the market.  The hybridizers have been doing a marvelous job hybridizing these mini versions of the hybrid teas and other big flowered roses and they are a great addition to the landscape.  My new favorite is Memphis Music by Whit Wells.  It is a striped velvety maroon red and yellow miniflora and very spectacular in the garden.  Minis and minifloras are generally more winter hardy than the big roses because they come in their own roots instead of being grafted to a rootstock.

Taking care of small garden is much easier than big garden.  You would rather garden in a small space and do an excellent job than garden in a huge garden and do a half baked one.  You just have to be discriminating in your choice of plants.  For this, you need the American Rose Society Guide to Growing Roses which give you the rating of roses in commerce.  You can obtain this by belonging to the American Rose Society.

Another excellent design technique for small space is to limit your choice of color to one color.  You’ll create impact in beds with one color.  I saw a bed of “Iceberg” roses as a foundation planting in a small garden in California and its effect was dramatic.  I bet you at night it’s even more pleasing since you have the effect of chiaroscuro, a play on light and shadow, great for a front yard garden bed.  If you don’t like white, then you can experiment with a bed of one color scheme or a monochromatic display like all shades of pink.

The only thing I must stress in doing a small garden is to plant roses with strong fragrance.  You are planting roses to enjoy them and if you can not have a big garden, only plant one with strong fragrance.  Everyone loves a rose and it is always associated with the old garden rose fragrance you remember when you are young, not the scentless rose you buy at the florist.  So plan your rose garden carefully and enjoy your new hobby.

Roses are easy plants to grow contrary to popular belief. Why do you think Roses have been around for millions of years?  All they need are food, water and sunlight.  Just like you and me. 

Here at Rose Gardening World, we’ll educate you about the Rose - our National Floral Emblem and the state flower of several states.  Welcome to the World of Rose Gardening or Rose Gardening World where Rose Gardening Tips, Rose Growing Advice, Planting a Rose Garden, Rose Descriptions, Where to Buy Roses, Where to see Rose Gardens, Rose Culture, Rose History, Rose Events, Rose Verses are all here in one place.  

We are constantly updating our contents so visit Rose Gardening World often.  We want to help you grow Beautiful Roses and we welcome comments.  Take time and smell the roses.  Happy Rose Gardening!

Check my other blogs:
Visit my website